Category Archives: Tuesday

Voice of the Customer

Tuesday Sessions – Tuesday 15 November 
10:45 – 11:30

For EY, part of its enterprise search program is a robust voice of the customer program. Ed Dale gives a holistic view of how EY did this, from establishing the business case for the program all the way through to implementation. He shares actual experiences with staffing and growing a successful program and show a demo. He offers key insights, proven techniques, and lessons learned. Separately, Matt Riley brings us up to date with new developments with Swiftype’s search engine.

Presented by: Ed Dale, Matt Riley

B101: Workspace of the Future

TRACK B • Digital Workspace of the Future – Tuesday 15 November 
10:45 – 11:30

The workspace of the future is here—and more changes are coming. It is an agile environment which continually evolves to suit the next generation— while also balancing older generation’s needs and wants. As organizations shift to a workforce whose majority are Digital Natives, organizations, at a bare minimum, need to be aware of the necessary characteristics required to foster a driven and collaborative workforce. Although some characteristics are here now—mobility, personalization of content, work/life balance—more significant changes (cognitive computing, electronic security, and role-based content delivery) are coming. Using data from APQC’s most current research, KM expert Hubert cuts through the hype and haziness of what behaviors are going to be needed in this emerging workspace to look at the importance of KM’s role in influencing them. Learn about the shift in expectations and discover the right path forward for your organization.

Presented by: Cindy Hubert

Vocab Design: Language Arts for the Lizard Brain

Tuesday Sessions – Tuesday 15 November 
10:45 – 11:15

When designing communication systems for others, we frequently run into wild discrepancies between what we expect our users to understand and what our users actually understand. One culprit of this understanding gap is the set of assumptions our always-on, automatic cognition systems make about what we see, experience, and read. By understanding how these systems work—and what sometimes makes them work against us—we can learn to make smarter recommendations for vocabularies that not only technically “work,” but that also help us better facilitate user, experience, and business goals for our clients.

Presented by: Andy Fitzgerald

C101: Building the Connective Tissue for the 21st-Century Organization

TRACK C • Social Collaboration – Tuesday 15 November 
10:45 – 11:30

Oxfam is an organization working to right the wrongs of hunger, poverty, and injustice. It is a confederation of 17 member organizations, working in more than 90 countries, in the development, humanitarian, and campaigning spheres. The organization employs more than 10,000 people and works with thousands of partner organizations around the globe. Since these organizations are separate legal entities, they have their own platforms, systems, and intranet. Recently, Oxfam embarked on a project to integrate the member organizations, including merging into one intranet, and hence linking these 10,000-plus people into one system. This session highlights both process and product considerations for decision making around intranet design and usability and the approaches taken to move forward. It spans the planning, organization, and initial implementation of the shared intranet platform and touches on additional considerations related to challenges, risks, and the emphasis around building a collaborative culture.

Presented by: Haneen Malallah, Neal McCarthy, Jo Lyon

A101: Informed Decision Making: Organizational Awareness, Clarity, & Shared Understanding

TRACK A • KM Strategies & Practices: People – Tuesday 15 November 
10:45 – 11:30

As the Combined Arms Center commenced its journey to improve the decision- making governing its apportionment of resources (i.e., time allotment, fiscal resources, and scheduling of man-hours), it required a change in culture. That culture-change revolved around the power of historical data that allowed a substantial look into the past while affording a useful (and a more predictive) view ahead, regardless of the echelon where one’s duties were conducted. As this data was accumulated, then presented, and later illustrated graphically, the shared substance contributed to leadership decisions and initiated shared-understanding of content that subordinate organizations and their members could expect from one another. This understanding enabled directors, department heads, and action-officers to articulate and convey the practical difficulties that naturally occur with competing organizational demands. The workforce now enjoys a more substantial influence in crafting the Combined Arms Center’s capacity to design, build, improve, and train America’s Army. Those graphic depictions, substantiated from live and authoritative data, engendered more informed decision-making at varying levels, empowered and informed decisions starting with the data’s posting to the information’s processing to its consumption, and finally, to a realization of the knowledge delivering greater organizational awareness.

Presented by: Guy Buice

Leveraging User Research for Taxonomy Design

Tuesday Sessions – Tuesday 15 November 
11:15 – 11:45

We need to move beyond fundamentally well-informed taxonomies toward taxonomies that are informed by user needs by incorporating user research into taxonomy design. By learning how to do basic, up-to-date research and analyzing it using a rigorous framework, we can confidently gather evidence of user needs and support a fundamental shift from well-informed collections of headings to building taxonomies that reflect the reality of user experience. Learn basic steps for conducting research (including establishing research objectives, determining research questions, and choosing participants), basic steps for rigorous analysis (including clustering methods and developing thesis statements), and examples of using evidence from research to make taxonomy design decisions.

Presented by: Rachel Price, Sarah Barrett

A102: Integrated KM

TRACK A • KM Strategies & Practices: People – Tuesday 15 November 
11:45 – 12:30

The Dubai Police Force has expended considerable effort and resources into developing a strategic perspective to KM. It has developed a unique program to motivate staff into sharing their expertise, thus harnessing the power of its new program, called “Integrated KM,” to overcome the various security challenges ahead. Every phase of this three-phased program has a specific aim and process. The first phase, started in 2013 and known as “inventory of skills and knowledge,” is specifically aimed at registering 80% of knowledge that is possessed by Dubai police officers in electronic form. The second phase of this program, begun in 2014, The Knowledge Project, is aimed at filling the knowledge gaps that exist within the Dubai police departments; this work was bridged through six steps. The third phase, known as The Knowledge Maturity Model started in 2015 and aims to measure the level of knowledge within Dubai Police, according to standards of the learning organization.

Presented by: Ibrahim Al Marri, Jamal Al-Jallaf

C102: Communities Matter!

TRACK C • Social Collaboration – Tuesday 15 November 
11:45 – 12:30

Communities of practice are the most popular approach in the KM arsenal, with more than two-thirds of organizations boasting some form of community program. But there are still a lot of questions about how to design effective communities and keep them active and purposeful over the long-term. This session provides practical advice for organizations looking to deploy new communities or increase engagement in/impact from existing community programs. Get tips and techniques for encouraging participation and convincing experts to move their conversations and interactions into the community environment, integrating social network technology into community programs, and making communities truly global so that they connect employees across languages, time zones, and cultures. Based on recent best practices studies on communities, our speakers combine insights with detailed examples from leading organizations with successful community programs.

Presented by: Lauren Trees, Darcy Lemons